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Eugene Willamette 2016 — Album Description
Photos in Album: 42 Album Created: 18 May 2017 Last Updated: 25 May 2017
To begin viewing the photos, you can browse the album — or view the contact sheet.
In August 2016 I rode my bike to McMenamins North Bank in Eugene, Oregon, in order to get a certain ‘experiences’ stamp in my McMenamins Passport. Seeing that I hardly ever ride my bike, and that I hardly ever go to Eugene, it is not at all surprising that I didn’t know anything about the wonderful 14-​mile Ruth Bascom Riverbank Path System (RBRPS) encompassing both sides of the Willamette River in central Eugene.

Discovering the RBRPS is just one of a number of new experiences I have had thanks to my McMenamins Passport adventure which I would not have had otherwise. After my lunch at North Bank on that day, I pedalled nearly five miles in one hour, during which I took 85 photos. Nevertheless, I had ridden only about one-​third of the Ruth Bascom Riverbank Path System. “I shall return!” I vowed to myself.



Five weeks later, in mid-​September, I was back at Alton Baker Park by 8:00 AM, ready to explore more of the Path System. The first four and a half miles were the same, as I rode southeast along the north bank of the Willamette from the park to the massive Whilamut Passage Bridge, crossed the river via the Knickerbocker Bicycle Bridge, and then headed northwest along the south bank to DeFazio Bridge. This time, instead of crossing over the bridge back to the north bank, I continued northwest and north for nearly four more miles until I reached the end of the West Bank Path at Owosso Bridge for pedestrians and bicycles.

After crossing to the East Bank Path, I pedalled about four miles south and southeast back to my truck at Alton Baker Park. The entire twelve-​and-​a-​half-​mile ride lasted two hours, during which time I took 50 photos. In combination with the 85 pictures from the first ride the previous month, I have narrowed them down to the best 42, which are presented in this album.
The photos in this album were taken with the  Olympus OM-D E-M5  camera.
To begin viewing the photos, you can browse the album — or view the contact sheet.